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Tourism and Protection of Cultural Property

The newest issue of the magazine Forum PCP (Protection of Cultural Property) deals with the complex theme of tourism and the protection of cultural property. Jeremie Magnin contributed an article about his research and the Swiss guestbook project (pp. 54-59). In it, Jeremie examines Zermatt visitors’ books from the 1850s and 1860s to show how British guests identified themselves abroad, how this influenced their material and textual practices, and what their inscriptions had to say about the relation between individuals and national ideology. British travellers’ entries could be as short as signing their names, writing a few sentences or, in the case of mountaineers, regularly taking more than one page to write about their climbs. Many of the latter after 1857, when the Alpine Club was founded, include the initials “AC.” These two cryptic letters stood for a specific set of values and behaviour that the British mountaineers were particularly proud of, as they believed that it distinguished them from other guests. Our analysis of Zermatt visitors’ books demonstrates how these cultural objects were used to construct national identity, notably by helping promote the Alpine Club as a model for British values. If the mountaineers seem to form an elite of independent individuals, their visitors’ book entries also suggest a culture of cooperation, and an awareness that they relied heavily on other climbers, local guides and landlords for their successful ascents.

Forum PCP is available for download at the following link: Forum PCP No 33/2019 – Tourism and Protection of Cultural Property

More Hunting in the High Alps

Jérémie Magnin’s hunt for guest books has yielded a large number of new finds, but he has also taken advantage of the summer months to photograph manuscripts.  In July, Jérémie went to Zermatt to see the 1865 Monte Rosa book, still owned by the Seiler family.  He and Patrick Vincent also spent a day looking at books from the Simplon and Great St.Bernard Hospices in the archives of the Congregation of St-Bernard in Martigny, and two days at the Musée Alpin and the Association des Amis du Vieux Chamonix.

On a side trip to Montanvers, they saw what was left of the Temple de la Nature, built in 1795 to replace Blair’s Hut, and where many famous tourists, including Shelley, signed their name in the guest book. Two hotels were built beside it, the first in 1840, the second in 1890. The latter is still a hotel and has been beautifully restored. Even more impressive was seeing what was left of the Mer de glace. A different kind of inscription marks the glacier’s level in 1990, only thirty years ago.